Get Creative · Student/ Teacher

Student, Teacher

Hey Guys!

I have taken inspiration from The DP Challenge and I have chosen to write about the “student, teacher” topic. The essential idea is so share a nugget of knowledge with you and teach you something new!

The topic of today is: How to take better photographs.

I love bloggers, reading about others’ lives, reviews and whats going on in the world really fascinates me, but … and this is a big but… I get so frustrated with people who just can’t seem to take a good photograph!!! Now I know this isn’t considered part of the blogging experience, because after all, it is about the writing. But all it takes is a little thought and the visual aids could be so much cleaner, and more effective. I studied photography for four years. This does not make me an expert, but it does mean I have spent four years criticising professional photography, and along the way I’ve learn a few bits and bobs. So without further ado! Here are my top tips for photographing better!!

  1. Focus! Make sure they’re in focus. Whatever photograph you upload, just make sure it’s in focus, no-one wants to be looking at an out of focus picture, no matter how pretty the subject was supposed to be. If the image isn’t in focus, then your viewers won’t be paying any attention to it. Try different focusing ranges from shallow to deep (only one part of the image in focus to everything in focus) shallow focus works really well if you want to highlight someone or something. For example if you’re writing a review for a product, shallow focus works well when shooting with that product.Hair, Makeup, 2015, Focus, Candles, Shallow Depth of Field
  2. Lighting. Hard lighting, bright lighting is best. You know how your photographs always look better when the sun is shining? That’s hard lighting! If you are using soft lighting (cloudy, dark etc) then you may struggle getting the right contrast and vibrancy in your picture, so additional editing will need to be done.

    Not sure why I had such an obsession with these fairy lights for this shoot!
    Not sure why I had such an obsession with these fairy lights for this shoot!
  3. Framing and Background. It’s easy to get tunnel vision when taking photographs, but people who view your photos, like your blog, may miss the point because they won’t spend half as long looking at it. The quickest way to improve a photograph is to clean up the background and the framing. Keep in mind the rule of thirds, which basically means break your image up using two horizontal lines and two vertical, of equal distance from each other and the edges of the image, place the most important aspects of the image at one of the intersecting points. Keep the background minimal, however if you can’t then use a shallow depth of field to throw it out of focus, and try to keep the important aspects of the image within the frame, this keeps the viewers eye within the image too.

    Image by Andreas Wonisch
  4. Perspective and Emotion. These are probably the two areas of a photograph that are the least thought about by amateur photographers. Perspective educes emotion, this is especially useful when photographing people, a high perspective gives authority to the viewer, whilst a low perspective gives authority to the subject. For example when you see pictures and photographs of super-heroes, the photographer is shooting from below, looking up.
    dog snow flakes tongue out
    Photo by Zoom Walls

    SUPERHERO PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHOW KAR HOO
  5. Quality of your camera. This is not so important when you have considered all of the above elements, because a poor camera can take wonderful pictures as long as the above have been considered, a good camera will take poor pictures if the camera isn’t the best. Camera’s on phones are just as good (sometimes better) than the standard compact camera. My top tip for shooting is to make sure you use a tripod for the best effect.

Canon 550D

So there you have it! My top tips for improving your photography! These tips are for absolute beginners, but if you’re interested in more top tips for more advanced photographers, then comment below!

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